Invited Speaker:
Professor Jeff Zacks
Washington University in St. Louis

Workshop Schedule

Workshop Aims

Narratives are ubiquitous in human experience. We use them to communicate, convince, explain, and entertain. As far as we know, every society in the world has narratives, which suggests they are rooted in our psychology and serve an important cognitive function. It is becoming increasingly clear that, to truly understand and explain human intelligence, beliefs, and behaviors, we will have to understand why and to what extent narrative is universal and explain (or explain away) the function it serves. The aim of this workshop series is to address key questions that advance our understanding of narrative and our ability to model it computationally.

Special Focus: Neuroscience

This workshop will be an appropriate venue for papers addressing fundamental topics and questions regarding narrative.  The workshop will be co-located with the following meetings:

Papers should be relevant to issues fundamental to the computational modeling and scientific understanding of narrative; we especially welcome papers relevant to the neuroscientific and cognitive aspects of narrative. All types of papers appropriate for previous editions of the workshop are appropriate for this edition. Additionally, neuroscientific or cognitive psychological experimental work which provide insights critical to computational modeling is appropriate for this workshop, and is encouraged. Discussing technological applications or motivations is not prohibited, but is not required. We accept both finished research and more tentative exploratory work.

Illustrative Topics and Questions

Submission Types

Three types of papers will be accepted:

Initial Submission Format

For review, papers may be submitted in either of two formats: Papers submitted for review not in either of these two formats will be returned. Final papers not submitted in LaTeX format will also be returned. Final papers should be submitted as zip files containing all .tex files and figures required for compilation, accompanied by a signed copy of the CMN'14 Author Agreement.

Initial Submission Procedure

Submissions are due Friday, April 4, 2014. Papers will be accepted until midnight UTC-11; this means that if it is April 4 anywhere in the world, you may still submit your paper. Papers should be submitted to the CMN workshop Easychair website:

https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cmn14

Important: Actual papers are due on the submission due date, not just abstracts. This is contrast to many humanities conferences, where authors submit only an abstract for review, and not an actual paper. Submitters are welcome to upload an abstract before the due date; however, papers that have only abstracts after the deadline will not be reviewed, and will not be included in the workshop. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out the week of May 9, 2014.

Final Submission Instructions

The workshop proceedings will be published as a volume in the Scholoss Dagstuhl OpenAccess Series in Informatics (OASIcs). Final papers must be submitted in LaTeX format. Papers should be prepared using the standard OASIcs template, using A4 paper. Final papers not submitted in LaTeX format will be returned. Final papers should be submitted as zip files containing all files and figures required for compilation, accompanied by a signed copy of the CMN'14 Author Agreement. Final versions are due Friday, May 30, 2014. Papers will be accepted until midnight UTC-11; this means that if it is May 30 anywhere in the world, you may still submit your paper. Papers should be submitted to the CMN'14 workshop Easychair website: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cmn14.

Registration

Registration is now open.

Register for CMN'14

Early registration is $250, available through May 31st, 2014. After that, registration is $300. Cancellation is allowed up to three weeks in advance of the event.

Organizing Committee

Program Committee

Previous Meetings